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For after the incarnation of our Lord we have an account of three different Pic Tifh imigrations to Britain ; but indeed thefe three, if they were at all, are handed down to us in a very vague falfe manner. \ The Orkney iflands, by rhe ef Fufion of Saxon blood, were di'ed; Thule with Pictift blcod v/as v/armed ; and icy lerne wept over her jroftrate heaps of Scots. But when Maximus was killed, they add that Gratian fucceeded to his office in Britain. Saint Patrick happened to be chaunting his matins with three of his bifhops, and a great number of clergy very early on a morning at a fountain called Clahach, to the eaft of Cruachan, when the two princeffes, at fun rife came forth to wafh their faces and view themfelves in that fountain as in a mirror. The kings of England, after the Norman inva- fion, ufed to fell garments f for a low price in the -- * Nor am I fo deformed, I have myfelf in a veil. The Irifh call thefe Sidhe, aerial fpirits or phantoms ; becaufe they are feen to come out of pleafant hills, where the common people imagine they refide : which fictitious habitations are called by us Sidhe or Siodha.

And it feems they ufed to return after fome time to regain their priftine lettlements in Britain, having reinforced themfelves by new Piclifh auxiliaries from Scythia, the parent country ; for which reafon tome have imagined the Picls were in general Gran- gers, and not the pof Tef Fors of North Britain from the ( -.nieft ages. The third hap- pened in the year of our Lord 383, in which year a Gothic army of the Pits is faid to have been in- vited from Scythia by Gratian and Valentinian, againft Maximus, the tyrant in Britain ; and from being the plunderers of North Britain, became the inhabitants. The names of three days of the week are called after the Moon, Mars, and Saturn, and *. with the Magi, while they lived with their fofter father, not far from Cruachan the palace of Connaught, entered into a converfation with faint Patrick about God, according to the ideas they had imbibed of their own gods, not having mentioned one of their country deities. When the princefies faw thefe venerable gentle- men cloathed in white furplices, and holding books in their hands, aftonimed at their unufual drefs and attitudes, they looked upon them to be the people Sidhe.

In truth declaring verfe I'Jl now indite The names of thefe three ancient, fmooth, wide lakes : Irrus* fair lake of foft expanded bofom, ioch-lurgan, and Fordreman's lake. There is yet a lough, in an inler of the fea, called alfo Lough-lurgan, time immemorial. Patrick, by his lifter being defcended \ f Obferve whether it (hould not be written Galedoniai W, Part III. 63 is one time called Longobardus, another time Hu- abaird, i. The mother of king ./Engus was xhe daughter of Mogseth, the brother of Achy Mumo, king of Ire- land. Concerning Qlmucad, the firname of king A CERTAIN modern hi dorian cf ours, endea- vours to amufe us by his witty (as bethinks) explanation of this vord Olmucadh^ which he makes great faine, in imitation of the low, ridiculous, and abfurd farcafms of chimney (weepers and oilier * So mentioned in the Scholiaft of the Martyrology of Tamlah in the Scholiaft of Marianus, 27th November; in Catha Jd Maguir, author of the Annals of Ulfter, from whom annals which treat of the con- queftof the Longobards by king Dingus are partly extratfed, and in the Martyrology of Cafhil, 27th November ; likewife in Marianus Gorman, Martyrologyof Dungall, the abovcmentioned Cathald 27. But he could not be ignorant, if he had attained a tolerable degree of claffical learning, that the bards were poets, which is a known fact, arid were highly re- fpedled, not only with us, but in Gaul and Britain, It is obvious from Strabo*. Mac means a fon, and a grandfon, but both imply pofteri'j in a wide fenfe, as "'Jefus the fon of David :" accord- ing to the expofition of civilians, " grandfons and great grandfons, and their defcendants, are compre- hended under the appellation of children f." - An or a Mac is prefixed to Irifh furnames, which are generally the proper names of fome of their an- ceilors, intimating they were furnamed the fons, grandfons, or pofterity of the perfon furname they adopted ; nor was it proper to ufe one name promifcuoufly in the place of another, as he writes O'Murphy, king of Leinfter, inflead of Mac Mur- phy (or rather Mac Murchadh :) but the family of O'Murchadh (which in Englifh is Morphy) is very different, and inferior to this family. He has even erred in the orthography, when he blames Carran for writing Malcolm, and not Mil- columb.

The Lee, the Bois, the Barrow bright, and Erne, The Sligo fair, the Moarne, and the Moy, The Finn, the Lif Fy, wat'ring Leinfter's plaip Are the fair rivers of high ancient fame, f The book ef Lecan, fol. The Bann, one of the nrft ten rivers of Ireland, running between Lea and Ellia, by Clanbraffil, pairing by Lough-n each, famous for its petrifying ^qualities, interfccls the county Antrim, and Fire- ria and Scrinia, in the county of Londonderry ; and thirdly, it falls into the fea from Colerain, and the cataract Eafcrive : more abounding by far, in Sal- mon, than any river in Europe. and ..capital of the county of Sligo, in Connaught : ii'ge Salmon,, leaping from the falt-water, are caught frem every day in the bed of the river ; when in moil rivers they do not come from the fea, unlefs at particular feafons of the year. Moreover, j Engus was firnamed Ol-mogeth from his grandfather, by his mother ; and Olrnu- cadh, as is commonly reported, fprung from that. Diodorus Siculus f calls a bard a compofer of fongs. On the con- trary, he improperly adds to the names of women by a Hibernifm TO nata, as Slania the daughter of O'Brian, inftead of Slania Brian, or of Slania, the daughter of Mr. 1 do not impute it fo * You alfo, O poets, who in panegyric tranfmit to late pofterity, rjous and brave fouls, in battle ^ain. For that word being formed from the particle Maol and Columba, the name of the patron of Scotland, is written Maolcoluim, wherefore a o y Seotic diphthong, is changed into a y or the Latin a by all the Trim Literati, as it were Moel, or Mal- colm, M. Columbus : but no one, fave an ignorant perfon, writes Milcolumb.

30, lie began to fteer his courfe to the country of the Cruthinians, until he came to the mountain Mis. is almofl the en- tire length of the kingdom, from a mountain of the fame name in Munfter. They imagine that Dalaradia, which is a maritime and eaftern country of Ulfler, extending from Newry to Mis Mountain, or from Cairg-inver- ufke to Linduachaill, has derived its name from the Dalaradians, (who are the defcendants of Fiach Araidh, king of UJfterf) and that the lame family were called by another name, Cruithne, becaufe the wife of Conall Kearnagh J, the mother of Euryal, king of Ulfler , his fon, from whom that Fiach has * In the year of our Lord 295. ^ Concerning whom, about the year of the world 3937. Thus the book of Lecan fays, as we have above related, f " Gud, and his fon Cathluan, the commanders of the Pids, ar- rived in Ii eland at Inverflainge J in Hykenfalia, when Crimthann was king of Leinfter, and Heri- mcn monarch of Ireland. Let, therefore, the pofterily of y Engus Olmucadh be ridiculed through Ireland and Britain, as well as in Ulfter.

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Cecrops the firft king of the Athenians, in the year 2394 decreed, that Jove mould be called and worfhipped as a god, in honour of whom, he in- flituted inanimate facritices, as Paufanius Atticus informs us.

Further, where there is no room for juft difquifition. fame, like a circle ; and whatever way you read it, you will find it, Anna. chap, 4, proves to a demonftration the Piets were in pofleflion a long time, antecedent to this, of the remote parts of the ifland. Seven plains during his reign, were reclaimed and rendered habitable ; viz. Part III: wenches, while he pretends to believe, " that the Ultonians, whofe prince was j Ehgus, were attacked by fome other party of the Irifh, as the Hollanders were by the Germans, on account of hogs ; becaufe that prince delighted as much in hogs, as other princes do in h&unds or horfes." He has conjec- tured abfurdly, impertinently, and with an air of buffoonery.

Now we muft obey the voice of authority alone ; we muft fometimes fcem ignorant of Irifh affairs atchieved before, and after the flood. This only I affirm, that, the antiquities and primitive archives of other countries, have not been fup- ported by a ftronger or more permanent balls; which ftill are handed down to us with an air of probability by their refpettive hiftorians. Achy F"oebarglas of the hpufe of Heber, king of Ireland when Sobarch was killed by Achy Meann king of the Fpmorians, coining to an en- gagement with Kermna at Punkermna, flew him and was declared king.

O G Y G I A, OR, A CHRONOLOGICAL ACCOUNT O F IRISH EVENTS: Collected from very ANCIENT DOCUMENTS, faithfully compared with each other, and fupported by the GENEALOGICAL and CHRONOLOGICAL Aid of the SACRED AND PROPHANE WRITINGS OF THE FIRST NATIONS OF THE GLOBE. Forty days before the flood, on the fifteenth day of the moon, being the Sabbath ; Csefarea, Baronna, and Balba, with fifty women and three men, Bith, Ladra, and Fintan, put in at Dun-na-mbarc j* ; Sliaw-beatha moun- tain, in Ulfter, was called after Bith ; Ardladrann, in the county of Wexford, was denominated from Ladra ; Fintan gave the name Feartfintain, to his burial-place, at Tultuinne J ; and Cuil-Keafrach, * One of the firft ten rivers of Ireland, of which we /hall fpeak in *he third chapter. Partholan, the jirjl inhabitant of this kingdom^ qf- tcr the flood* IN the year after the flood f, three hundred and twelve, Partholan with his colony, landed at Inver-Sgene, in Kerry, in the month of May, the fourteenth day of the moon, on a. We may collect from this, and other fuch accounts, that our countrymen, in regulating and p'-inting out xras, ftudied particularly the motion and af- pects of the moon, from the earlieft periods, ac- cording to very ancient writers : for I cannot com- prehend, how that obfervation of the' time was re- marked, viz. Loch Lurgan^ Loch furdreamhain* Buas^ Banna^ Bearbha bbuan y Sligeacb, Modhorn^ Muadb, Fiomi, Lift a Lalgbnibh go gleitb^ Is iadfoin na Seanaibhne *. The harbour of Wexford- 55 years before the Chriftiairsera. He totally vanquifhed the Ernaans of the Belgian line, by the affiftance of a lake fuddenly ipringing upon them, ftill known by the name of Erne, in Ulfter. Ward * places thofe Erdini- ans of the two Brefinies, and the inhabitants of Fermanagh, a long time after near lough Erne. JElngtis Olmucady the 33^ king of Ireland: NGUS * Olmucadj of the Herimonian de cent, having killed king Achy, in the battle of Cliach, got pof Teffion of the crown. He has not read the etymological book of Cormac, bifhop and king of Munfter, in which he might fee Kithearn, as tf Kith-orn : Kith, that is, Rath* a battle ; Orn, as if Orguin ; Or, that is, to Jburn ; Gum, to {laughter. com- monly Kerns : they fought with javelins tyed with firings, darts, and knives called jkcynts. claufe 25, among the articles to be obferved in Ireland, the fixth was againft the fu'pporters and leaders of the Kern? Vos quoquc^ qui fortes animas belloque peremplas Laudlbus in longum^ V cites, dimittis #vum Plttrima fecuri fudijlis carmina Bardi*.

WRITTEN ORIGINALLY IN LATIN BY RODERIC O'FLAHERTY, TRANSLATED BY THE REV". f A Dunum, or fortified harbour for fmall veflels, which Giraldus Cambrenfis calls the ihore of fmall fliips, fituate in Corcodubnia; a country in the weft of Munfter. $ and Carn-K.eafrach*, in Connaught, obtained them names from Csefarea. on a Wednefday, in the month of May, but from the Scythian language, which the ancient Germans nearly retained ; as we are in- formed by thofe converfant in the German tongue J. Fordreman, is a lough in Kerry, near Tralee, or riear the mountain Mif-finloch, in Keara, iix the barony of Mayo ; which formerly belonged to Irras-Damnon, or Eyre-Connaught. In the reign of Fiach, the rivers Fleafg, Mang, and Labrann, called io from that Labrann, are faid to have made their appearance. Having gained many victories at home and abroad, he fignaiized himfelf by obtaining the name of Ali-bhuad-hach, which iignifies grand conquer- or, or victorious. Therefore Kethern* as it were Katb-or-gum, in battle burning aud killing, "The Irifh of the middle age, as Ware fays*, trained two kinds of infantry ; the one, called Gal- loglaffes, were armed with an iron helmet* a coat of mail, and a cuirafs ; befides, they carried in one hand a very fharp battle-axe like the ancient Gauls, of whom Marcellinus fpeaks in his i Qth book : the Antiquities of Ireland, c. , and the people called Idlemen, unlefs in the confines the enemy, at their own expence." So far from the archives of the Tower of London. In Wales, the bards kept the infignia of the no bility, and their genealogies.

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