Employee dating the boss

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Hospitality, Financial Services, Transportation and Utilities, Information Technology, and Health Services all topped the list as having higher than average office dating.

As a business owner, you might ask: "Where is the legal issue?

" or "What's the best policy regarding workplace dating?

" While the answer to the first question is pretty simple, the answer to the latter is less obvious.

The legal issue is what I like to call the "amplification" of potential liability that always exists around the employer-employee relationship.

There will foreseeably be claims of favoritism, or even discrimination or harassment.

Not all relationships last forever, of course, but if and when the relationship between manager and subordinate ends, the work relationship may need to continue.

That can be uncomfortable for both parties as well as for co-workers. Her work has been published in "Entrepreneur," "Complete Woman" and "Toastmaster," among many other trade and professional publications.

In a poorer scenario, the relationship would end badly, one of the employees could claim that the relationship was non-consensual, or that sexual harassment existed.

According to a Career Builder survey, interoffice dating has a fairly high success rate--of the 38% of people surveyed that dated a co-worker at least once, 31% went on to marry that co-worker! If you believe the stats of new employees entering the workforce, it might seem so.

But a lot of companies don't let the rank and file decide--they adopt policies that ban or limit workplace dating--all in the name of lowering liability.

The Society for Human Resource Management and Career conducted a Workplace Romance survey in 2006 and found that only 9 percent of the HR professionals surveyed indicated that dating among employees was prohibited in their organizations.

More than 70 percent did not have formal written or verbal policies dealing with romantic relationships.

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